Monday, July 3, 2017

NEW Dry Brushing for Skin


                                                                              from the wellness Mama

 


You probably brush your hair, and your teeth  but do you brush your skin? And why would you?

Dry Brushing for Skin

This practice has been gaining popularity lately and with good reason. I’ve even noticed “dry brushing” as an offering on the menu at spas in hotels I stayed at recently. Dry Brushing has many potential benefits from smoother skin to helping with lymphatic drainage.
So what is it and why should you consider doing it?
Dry brushing is exactly what it sounds like… brushing the skin in a particular pattern with a dry brush, usually before showering.
In dry brushing, the skin is typically brushed toward the heart, starting at the feet and hands and brushing toward the chest.

Benefits of Dry Brushing

I’ve been dry brushing my skin for years, mostly because it feels great and makes my skin softer, but there are other benefits as well:

1. Lymphatic Support:

The lymphatic system is a major part of the body’s immune system. It is made up of organs and lymph nodes, ducts and vessels that transport lymph throughout the body. Many of these lymph vessels run just below the skin and proponents of dry brushing claim that brushing the skin regularly helps stimulate the normal lymph flow within the body and help the body detoxify itself naturally.

2. Exfoliation

This benefit is often noticed the first time a person dry brushes. The process of running a firm, natural bristled brush over the skin helps loosen and remove dead skin cells, naturally exfoliating skin. I noticed much softer skin in the first few days and weeks after I started dry brushing and my skin has stayed soft. Dry brushing is one of the simplest and most natural ways to exfoliate skin. I love this benefit of skin brushing and how soft my skin feels when I do this regularly!

3. Clean Pores (& Smaller Pores!)

The added benefit of exfoliating the skin, is clearing oil, dirt and residue from the pores. Using a specialized smaller gentler dry brush for the face, I notice that my face is softer and my pores are much less noticeable.

4. Cellulite Help

Though the evidence is anecdotal, I’ve found many accounts of people who claimed that regular dry brushing greatly helped their cellulite.  There isn’t much research to back the cellulite claims, but dry brushing feels great and makes skin softer, so there isn’t really any downside to trying it!

5. Natural Energy Boost

I can’t explain why but dry brushing always gives me a natural energy boost. For this reason, I wouldn’t recommend dry brushing at night but it is great in the morning. One theory is that because it increases circulation, it also increases energy. Either way, dry brushing is part of my morning routine.

Selecting a Dry Brush

  use a firm, natural bristle brush with a handle, which allows me to reach my entire back and easily brush the bottoms of my feet and the backs of my legs.
This set of brushes is my favorite because it includes a face brush and two body brushes with different firmness. When I started dry brushing, my skin was much more sensitive and I preferred the softer one, and now I much prefer the firmer brush. With the set, I have options.

How to Dry Brush: The Method

Dry brushing can be done daily, preferably in the morning before showering. Start with a gentle brush and soft pressure. Work up to a firmer brush and more firm pressure over time.

Here’s How to Dry Brush the Skin:

  1. Starting at the feet, I brush the bottoms of my feet and up my legs in long, smooth strokes. I typically brush each section of skin 10 times. For lymph flow, I always brush toward the heart/chest area where the lymph system drains. As a good rule of thumb, always brush toward the center of the body.
  2. Repeat the same process with the arms, starting with the palms of the hands and brushing up the arm toward the heart. Again, I brush each section of skin 10 times.
  3. On the stomach and armpits, brush in a circular clockwise motion.
  4. I then repeat the process on my abdomen and back and my face with a more delicate brush.
Note: Don’t brush too hard! A soft and smooth stroke often works best. My skin is slightly pink after brushing, but it should never be red or sting. If it hurts at all, use less pressure!
  brush before showering and use a natural lotion after showering.
Replace the brush every 6-12 months as the bristles will eventually wear out. I also recommend washing the brush every few weeks to remove dead skin cells.

But, Does Dry Brushing Actually Work?

The evidence is divided and several sources point out the obvious fact- there have not been any specific scientific studies about dry brushing. Much of the evidence, especially relating to the cellulite benefit, is anecdotal and much more research would be needed before dermatologists would consider it a legitimate medical treatment.
Here’s the thing:
It isn’t meant to be a medical treatment and shouldn’t be considered one. Dermatologists also claim that cellulite is genetic and that there is no cure, while  some would disagree and points the finger at polyunsaturated Omega-6 fats in our diet.
Supporters of dry brushing claim that it can stimulate the lymph system, help the body rid itself of toxins and increase circulation or energy. Even dermatologists agree that gently brushing the skin does have exfoliating benefits and may stimulate the body in a way similar to massage, which certainly does have well-documented benefits
I’m not completely sold on all of those benefits, but this definitely falls in the “can’t hurt” category. I have personally dry brushed for years and noticed that my skin is softer (and possibly firmer, though this is hard to measure) from dry brushing. Skin brushing is very invigorating, and it can’t hurt, so it has become part of my daily routine.
Especially during pregnancy,  people have found that dry brushing seemed to help keep  from getting stretch marks and also seemed to help tighten skin after pregnancy.

Bottom Line: Find What Works for You

At the end of the day, researchers will likely never do studies on dry brushing. There is no incentive to do such a study when a good quality brush costs less than $20 and is available online. At the same time, it is generally agreed that the practice is harmless and at worst ineffective. Like any aspect of health (or life), it is important to do your own research, try things, and gauge the effects for yourself.
I personally like dry brushing for the smoother skin and burst of energy, but give it a try and see what you think. READ NEXT ARTICLE


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I’m a professional Esthetician specializing in treating Acne and I’m also a Beauty Advisor during the day. I’m passionate in helping others have beautiful skin. But at night I am whipping up decadent desserts, amazing pies, and delicious, healthy meals. Cooking for me is an expression of my creative side and I enjoy making meals for friends, family and co workers. 

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