Thursday, February 4, 2016

MEG 21 skin care helps prevent gycation with Supplamine


What's Glycation & how  it can age our skin


You can click-on the blue button below  and listen- in to my interview with Dr. Tobia

 Glycation” is buzzword that is gaining more momentum in the consumer and retail sectors. Although most skin care professionals know the term, glycation is being discussed in consumer magazines, as well. It is always to your professional advantage to know what clients are reading in order to reduce the chance of being caught off guard. On today's episode the beauty advisor talks with Dr. Annette Tobia Founder and CEO of Dynamis Skin Science and co-inventor of the technology behind MEG 21 and the development of Supplamine, Dr. Annette Tobia has over 30 years experience in launching and developing new life science companies .find out more about Dr. Tobia  and her skin care Meg 21 Here!   

The glycation process

It is already known that excess sugar can lead to a variety of health concerns, but what most forget is that too much sugar can also affect the skin. Sugar can be digested in many forms, including the consumption of carbohydrates and can even be formed via meal preparation. If there is too much sugar in the body, protein molecules can cross-link with sugar molecules.1 Once this cross-linking process has occurred, the new sugar proteins are called advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The human body does not recognize AGEs as normal, and will produce antibodies that cause inflammation in the skin. Once formed, AGEs tend to gravitate toward dermal collagen and elastin.

As people age, proteins in the body can become damaged through the introduction of AGEs—one of the key factors in aging of the skin. The more sugar you eat, whether processed or natural, the more AGEs are produced. When the body is overwhelmed with AGEs, collagen becomes compromised. Effects of the glycation process at the cellular level of the skin’s structure may result in wrinkling, loss of elasticity, stiffness, accelerated aging and compromised barrier function. Other conditions that appear when microcir­culation is damaged and cell turnover slows is a loss of volume in the face due to redistri­bution of fat. Although the development of lines and wrinkles is normal as clients age, it is difficult to see clients in their 20s resemble a person in their 40s, which is more frequently being witnessed in treatment rooms.

The science is this: When you have sugar molecules in your system, they bombard the body's cells like a meteor ­shower—glomming onto fats and proteins in a process known as glycation. This forms advanced glycation end products (commonly shortened, appropriately, to AGEs), which cause protein fibers to become stiff and malformed. Much of what is known about glycation's ill effects comes from diabetes research: The connective-tissue damage and chronic inflammation resulting from diabetics' sustained high blood sugar can lead to debilitating conditions, such as cataracts, Alzheimer's, vascular tightening, and diseases of the pancreas and liver.
The proteins in skin most prone to glycation are the same ones that make a youthful complexion so plump and springy—collagen and elastin. When those proteins hook up with renegade sugars, they become discolored, weak, and less supple; this shows up on the skin's surface as wrinkles, sagginess, and a loss of radiance. The presence of AGEs also makes the complexion more vulnerable to bad-news assailants such as UV light and cigarette smoke.  Number one, the glucose makes the cells abnormal; and number two, it creates free radicals. So you get a double whammy when it comes to aging.
To an extent, glycation is a fact of life. It's happening right now, to all of us. It can even be measured: The cross-links formed between sugars and proteins emit a fluorescence, which scientists can capture using Visia complexion-analysis cameras. "If you take a fluorescent image of children, their faces will come out very dark,  but with each decade, the AGEs, and therefore the brightness, will accumulate more and more." This means that by the time we reach our dotage, we can expect our Visia visages to resemble those of the incandescent aliens in Cocoon. The external signs of glycation show up around the age of 30 or 35, when a perfect storm of built-up sun damage, environmental oxidative stress, hormonal changes, and the development of AGEs begins to result in, well, a-g-e. "When you're younger, your body has more resources to ward off damage, and you're producing more collagen  When you reach a certain age, these sugar by-products begin to build up at the same time that your threshold for damage is getting lower."
Lest you rue the day you first tasted a Krispy Kreme, note: Refined sugar isn't the only culprit. Health-nut staples such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables turn to glucose when digested too—albeit in less damaging fashion. And even if we could completely eliminate all types of sugar from our diets, we shouldn't: It's an essential fuel for cells and energy metabolism, critical to survival. "For most people with normal levels of glucose, the glycation process is something that happens gradually over the course of a lifetime, and it's really not that big of a deal, "but diet and lifestyle choices can affect how quickly the effects can be seen on the skin." One of the key hallmarks of glycation, is the yellowing of skin often seen prematurely in smokers. "Smoke reduces antioxidants in skin, and smokers' vitamin C and E are being used up trying to take care of all this oxidation that's caused by smoking, so they don't have a lot of antioxidant potential to take care of normal processes like glycation, And if you add a high-glycemic-index diet, you're just asking for trouble.


Some of the worse offenders:


Concentrated Fruit Juice
This is often named by the actual fruit, such as apple or pear. As Popkin explained, China's apple crop has emerged and overtaken Caribbean cane sugar as a popular imported source of sugar in consumer goods. Because fruit has lower and fewer tariffs than sugar, it's cheaper to import, he says. What's more, 'concentrated fruit juice' sounds healthier and more natural than high fructose corn syrup or other sugar syrups. "It's still all sugar," Popkin says.

Dextrose
Dextrose is a simple form of glucose, but as WiseGeek explains, many manufacturers believe that fewer consumers have negative associations with dextrose than with glucose. 

Maltose
Maltose -- also called malt sugar -- is a type of sugar made from two bonded glucose molecules. High Maltose Corn Syrup is another common sweetener -- simply the result of processing corn in a different way.



Crystalline Fructose
Crystalline fructose is fructose derived from corn, though it is thought to be about 20 percent sweeter than sugar and 5 percent sweeter than high-fructose corn syrup
Evaporated Cane Juice
Evaporated cane juice is simply a differently processed sugar, according to  It is less processed so it retains trace vitamins and minerals but has the same amount of calories as sugar,

Invert Sugar
Invert sugar -- also known as inverted sugar syrup -- is similar to honey, maple syrup and high fructose corn syrup, in that it is simply sucrose (table sugar) that has been separated into its composite parts: glucose and fructose. It has a longer shelf life than crystal sugar and is sweeter as well. 

Raw Sugar
When sugar is minimally processed and retains some of the molasses that is a natural byproduct of rendering sugar cane into sugar crystals, it is referred to as "raw." That might make it more natural than chemically treated sweeteners, but it doesn't mean it is actually raw or untreated. And as Cathy Nonas, director of obesity and diabetes programs at New York City's North General Hospital told ABC News: "Just because something is natural doesn't mean it's particularly healthy for you."

Malt Syrup
This sweetener is most often made from barley grains, that have been malted -- or transformed into the sugar, maltose.

Cane Crystals
"Cane crystals" is just a synonym for evaporated cane sugar. 

Fructose
Fructose is sugar found in fruit. It is the sweetest component of commercially available sugars and, in high concentrations and high amounts, it's what researchers like Robert Lustig -- a pediatric endocrinologist at University of California, San Francisco and an expert on the metabolic effects of sugar -- believe is responsible for contributing to obesity, diabetes and more.
 Excessive sugar in the diet is not the best idea when it comes to healthy living. Nonetheless, few of us are consuming sugar in recommended moderate amounts and most of us are eating tons of it. In fact, worldwide we are consuming about 500 extra calories a day from sugar. That's just about what you would need to consume if you wanted to gain a pound a week. Most people know that sugar is not good for them, but for some reason, they think the risk of excess sugar consumption is less than that of having too much saturated and trans fat, sodium or calories. Perhaps it's sugar's lack of sodium or fat that make it the "lesser of several evils," or perhaps people are simply of the mind frame that what they don't know won't hurt them. If you really knew what it was doing to your body, though, you might just put it at the top of your "foods to avoid" list. Here are ten things that may surprise you about sugar.
1. Sugar can damage your heart
While it's been widely noted that excess sugar can increase the overall risk for heart disease, a 2013 study in the Journal of the American Heart Association displayed strong evidence that sugar can actually affect the pumping mechanism of your heart and could increase the risk for heart failure. The findings specifically pinpointed a molecule from sugar (as well as from starch) called glucose metabolite glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) that was responsible for the changes in the muscle protein of the heart. These changes could eventually lead to heart failure. Approximately half of the people that are diagnosed with heart failure die within five years.
2. Sugar specifically promotes belly fat
Adolescent obesity rates have tripled in the past 30 years and childhood obesity rates have doubled. Many of us are aware of the data that demonstrates just how literally big our future is looking, but beyond the studies and all the initiatives to curb childhood obesity, one needs only to visit an amusement park, school or mall to truly see what is happening. One factor that seems to inflict obese children is fat accumulation in the trunk area of the body. Why? One cause may be the increase in fructose-laden beverages. A 2010 study in children found that excess fructose intake (but not glucose intake) actually caused visceral fat cells to mature -- setting the stage for a big belly and even bigger future risk for heart disease and diabetes.
3. Sugar is the true silent killer
Move over salt and hypertension, you've got competition. Sugar, as it turns out, is just as much of a silent killer. A 2008 study found that excess fructose consumption was linked to an increase in a condition called leptin resistance. Leptin is a hormone that tells you when you've had enough food. The problem is, we often ignore the signal our brain sends to us. For some people though, leptin simply does not want to work, leaving the person with no signal whatsoever that the body has enough food to function. This in turn can lead to over consumption of food and consequently, obesity. Why the silent killer? Because it all happens without symptoms or warning bells. If you've gained weight in the past year and can't quite figure out why, perhaps you should look at how much fructose you're feeding your body.
4. Sugar may be linked to cancer production and may effect cancer survival
In the world of nutrition, it's hard to talk about sugar without talking about insulin. That's because insulin is sugar's little chaperone to the cells, and when too much of it is consumed, or our insulin does not work (probably because we're eating too much sugar) and the body revolts. One connection that has been well documented in the literature is the link between insulin resistance and cancer . A 2013 study found that sugars in the intestine triggered the formation of a hormone called GIP (controlled by a protein called β-catenin that is completely dependant on sugar levels), that in turn, increases insulin released by the pancreas. Researchers found that β-catenin may in fact affect the cells susceptibility to cancer formation. Further studies have found negative associations between high sugar and starch intake and survival rates in both breast cancer patients and colon cancer patients.
5. Your sugar "addiction" may be genetic
If you've ever said, "I'm completely addicted to sugar," you may actually be correct. A recent study of 579 individuals showed that those who had genetic changes in a hormone called ghrelin consumed more sugar (and alcohol) than those that had no gene variation. Ghrelin is a hormone that tells the brain you're hungry. Researchers think that the genetic components that effect your ghrelin release may have a lot to do with whether or not you seek to enhance a neurological reward system through your sweet tooth. Findings with this study were similar to study conducted in 2012 as well.
6. Sugar and alcohol have similar toxic liver effects on the body
A 2012 paper in the journal Nature, brought forth the idea that limitations and warnings should be placed on sugar similar to warnings we see on alcohol. The authors showed evidence that fructose and glucose in excess can have a toxic effect on the liver as the metabolism of ethanol -- the alcohol contained in alcoholic beverages had similarities to the metabolic pathways that fructose took. Further, sugar increased the risk for several of the same chronic conditions that alcohol was responsible for. Finally, if you think that your slim stature keeps you immune from fructose causing liver damage, think again. A 2013 study found that liver damage could occur even without excess calories or weight gain.
7. Sugar may sap your brain power
When I think back on my childhood, I remember consuming more sugar than I probably should have. I should have enjoyed my youth back then, because unfortunately, all the sugar may have accelerated the aging process. A 2009 study found a positive relationship between glucose consumption and the aging of our cells. Aging of the cells consequently can be the cause of something as simple as wrinkles to something as dire as chronic disease. But there is other alarming evidence that sugar may affect the aging of your brain as well. A 2012 study found that excess sugar consumption was linked to deficiencies in memory and overall cognitive health. A 2009 study in rats showed similar findings.
8. Sugar hides in many everyday "non-sugar" foods
While many of my patients strive to avoid the "normal" sugary culprits (candy, cookies, cake, etc.), they often are duped when they discover some of their favorite foods also contain lots of sugar. Examples include tomato sauce, fat free dressing, tonic water, marinates, crackers and even bread.
9. An overload of sugar (specifically in beverages) may shorten your life
A 2013 study estimated that 180,000 deaths worldwide may be attributed to sweetened beverage consumption. The United States alone accounted for 25,000 deaths in 2010. The authors summarize that deaths occurred due to the association with sugar-sweetened beverages and chronic disease risk such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer.
10. Sugar is making us fat
I figured I'd leave the most obvious fact for last. While you may be aware that too many calories from any source will be stored as fat if not burned, what you may not connect is that the lack of other nutrients in sugar actually makes it much easier to eat gobs of it with no physical effects to warn us of the danger that lurks. Foods rich in fiber, fat and protein all have been associated with increased fullness. Sugar will give you the calories, but not the feeling that you've had enough. That's why you can have an entire king-size bag of licorice (with it's sky high glycemic index at the movies and come out afterwards ready to go for dinner.
On a final note, it's important to point out that simple sugars from milk (in the form of lactose) don't display the same negative health effects that we see in the literature when reviewing sugar's effects on the body. Simple sugars coming from fruit are also less concerning given their high amounts of disease-fighting compounds and fiber.
So now you know, and knowing perhaps can create action. You can do something about decreasing your overall sugar consumption without feeling deprivation or sheer frustration! Plus Here's a great way to Keep Your skin protected and reverse some of that skin aging with Meg 21 skin care.


How does MEG 21 differ from other anti-aging skin treatment products?

MEG 21 products are exclusively formulated with  unique and patented Supplamine, the first patented product clinically proven to fight glycation, inflammation, and oxidative stress, three key aging factors that cause accelerated aging, wrinkling and irritation of the skin.
Neither a cosmetic cover nor a simple emollient-rich moisturizer, Supplamine is the result of a medical breakthrough that has implications far greater than that of beauty, although in this case, health is beautiful.

http://meg21.com/products/

                                                   Smooth Radiance: Advanced Formula

 

Get More Hot health & beauty tips deliver right to your inbox! Join our e-mail list!
 



3 comments:

  1. I have used the Meg 21 and love it! highly recommend!

    ReplyDelete
  2. really fascinating info would love to learn more

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You Can just visit Dr. Tobia's website www.meg21.com

      Delete

About Me

My photo

I’m a professional Esthetician specializing in treating Acne and I’m also a Beauty Advisor during the day. I’m passionate in helping others have beautiful skin. But at night I am whipping up decadent desserts, amazing pies, and delicious, healthy meals. Cooking for me is an expression of my creative side and I enjoy making meals for friends, family and co workers. 

Have a ouestion?

Contact Form

Name

Email *

Message *